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Archive for March 7th, 2009

hughhefner

Some interesting quotes from the arguably the most famous hedonist of our times:

On dreams:

Life is too short to be living somebody else’s dream.

On fantasies:

The interesting thing is how one guy, through living out his own fantasies, is living out the fantasies of so many other people.

On civilization:

The major civilizing force in the world is not religion, it is sex.

On colors:

Picasso had his pink period and his blue period. I am in my blonde period right now.

On age:

The big surprise for me is that age is just a number, … It’s a number without meaning. A person who dies at 40 — through cancer, a car accident, what have you — how old is that person, really, at 38? He’s near the end of his life, whether he knows it or not. And what about a person who dies at 100? How old is that person, really, at 78?

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Two great inspirational quotes from William Arthur Ward:

On Education:

The mediocre teachers tell.
The good teachers explain.
The superior teachers demonstrate.
The great teachers inspire.

On Risk:

To laugh is to risk appearing a fool,
To weep is to risk appearing sentimental
To reach out to another is to risk involvement,
To expose feelings is to risk exposing your true self
To place your ideas and dreams before a crowd is to risk their loss
To love is to risk not being loved in return,
To hope is to risk despair,
To try is to risk to failure.

But risks must be taken because the greatest hazard in life is to risk nothing.
The person who risks nothing, does nothing, has nothing is nothing.
He may avoid suffering and sorrow,
But he cannot learn, feel, change, grow or live.
Chained by his servitude he is a slave who has forfeited all freedom.
Only a person who risks is free.

The pessimist complains about the wind;
The optimist expects it to change;
And the realist adjusts the sails.

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Critical Thinkers Unite!

criticalthinker

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Critical thinkers unite!

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Below is an excerpt from the website of Tony Abaya, a well known author here in the Philippines on “Divine Intervention”

http://acabaya.blogspot.com/search/label/Divine%20intervention

And our neighbors overtook us without pleading for divine intervention. South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Hong Kong, as well as Thailand and the large (28%) ethnic Chinese population of Malaysiaare predominantly Buddhist. So are Old Tiger Japan, New Tiger China, and Baby Tiger Vietnam.

Buddhists do not believe in a personal God who intervenes in the affairs of men and women. What they have is a personal philosophy, an ethical way of life, that says that their station in the next life depends on how they live the present life.

Those who live their present life honorably, through hard work, good deeds and meditation, have a good karma and will re-incarnate to a higher level in the next life. Conversely, those who live a dishonorable life in the here and now have a bad karma and will re-incarnate to a lower life form – a donkey, a frog, a snake – in the next life.

It does not mean that there are no deviants, criminals, evil-doers etc among Buddhists. Far from it. But it does mean that the motivation to live an honorable life is internally

generated and internally directed because Buddhists do not depend on an external personal God to reward them when they do good, or to punish them when they do evil.

At a higher metaphysical plane, Buddhism and Christianity do converge, as in the case of the Catholic intellectual Thomas Merton. But on the level of the average believer, Christians – especially Roman Catholics of the Hispanic variety, of which we Filipinos are a subset – do have a marked dependence on an external personal God, whom we constantly implore to intervene in our affairs. Such dependence cannot but dull the ability, even the readiness, to solve human problems using human resources and human ingenuity. *****

Some people believe that religiosity makes people more moral than unreligious people, now that is a different story. What Tony Abaya seems to state here is that in some cases, religiosity makes economic prosperity take a back seat due to “a marked dependence on an external personal God”.

We may never know why a lot of secular nations, some unreligious and others even atheistic are more prosperous than a lot of religious countries. Right now, one of the only countries bucking the trend is the United States which is both first world and religious. But again in the middle of its financial crisis the worst may yet come.

Check out this image from a recent gallup poll on religious fervor between nations:

gallup-religion

Religiosity may not be bad, but I feel overly dependence on God for things which man can do himself is detrimental to one’s economic situation. Tony Abaya states in a concise manner:

But on the level of the average believer, Christians – especially Roman Catholics of the Hispanic variety, of which we Filipinos are a subset – do have a marked dependence on an external personal God, whom we constantly implore to intervene in our affairs. Such dependence cannot but dull the ability, even the readiness, to solve human problems using human resources and human ingenuity. *****

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