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Archive for July 3rd, 2010

Can be taken in two ways.

1. job opening

2. a pursuance of a lunatic that is to be annihilated or kept within inescapable confines

We can add a 3rd way, and that is a joke. Example:

“Lunatic”
by J. H. Hill

I like hunting fossils, a hobby that isn’t exactly my wife’s favorite. On one excursion, I found the petrified bones of a squirrel-like mammal. When I brought them home and told my wife what they were, she squelched my excitement.

“I’ve heard of many a squirrel bringing a nut home,” she remarked, “but this is the first time I’ve heard of a nut bringing a squirrel home.”

Haha! I can’t stop laughing! But let’s go back to the 1st possible meaning which is the job opening. Disturbing, isn’t it? But how prevalent. Perhaps we have ceased to be disturbed about it, too.
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Kedrosky today on risk-aversion between Catholics and Protestants:

We examine the relations between mutual fund risk-taking behaviors and local religious beliefs. We find that funds located in regions with lower Protestant population or higher Catholic population tend to have higher volatilities of fund returns, consistent with Protestants (Catholics) being more (less) risk-averse compared to general population.

More here.

“Sent from my BlackBerry® wireless handheld”

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Those who were curious about the gospels and texts explored by Peter Owen Jones in the documentary featured today, can refer to the Nag Hammadi Library resource online:

An Overview of the Nag Hammadi Texts

When analyzed according to subject matter, there are six separate major categories of writings collected in the Nag Hammadi codices:

Writings of creative and redemptive mythology, including Gnostic alternative versions of creation and salvation: The Apocryphon of John; The Hypostasis of the Archons; On the Origin of the World; The Apocalypse of Adam; The Paraphrase of Shem.  (For an in-depth discussion of these, see the Archive commentary on Genesis and Gnosis.)

Observations and commentaries on diverse Gnostic themes, such as the nature of reality, the nature of the soul, the relationship of the soul to the world: The Gospel of Truth; The Treatise on the Resurrection; The Tripartite Tractate; Eugnostos the Blessed; The Second Treatise of the Great Seth; The Teachings of Silvanus; The Testimony of Truth.

Liturgical and initiatory texts: The Discourse on the Eighth and Ninth; The Prayer of Thanksgiving; A Valentinian Exposition; The Three Steles of Seth; The Prayer of the Apostle Paul. (The Gospel of Philip, listed under the sixth category below, has great relevance here also, for it is in effect a treatise on Gnostic sacramental theology).

Writings dealing primarily with the feminine deific and spiritual principle, particularly with the Divine Sophia: The Thunder, Perfect Mind; The Thought of Norea; The Sophia of Jesus Christ; The Exegesis on the Soul.

Writings pertaining to the lives and experiences of some of the apostles: The Apocalypse of Peter; The Letter of Peter to Philip; The Acts of Peter and the Twelve Apostles; The (First) Apocalypse of James; The (Second) Apocalypse of James, The Apocalypse of Paul.

Scriptures which contain sayings of Jesus as well as descriptions of incidents in His life: The Dialogue of the Saviour; The Book of Thomas the Contender; The Apocryphon of James; The Gospel of Philip; The Gospel of Thomas.

Interesting research material for those looking at historical context of Christianity.

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Even after centuries of new research available, few Christians have gone about finding out the origins of the most popular faith on Earth and among the many things Christians take for granted is the origin of the modern Bible.

The New Testament in particular–is the foundational text of the Christian faiths–however the text did not begin as it appears today.

In an interesting documentary, Peter Owen Jones examines the early evolution of the New Testament, and particularly the various gospels that were not included in the modern Bible.

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If you agree that Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus, well, it seems that common Martian mental problems may differ from Venusians.

From our previous (light) discussion on how fictional characters in Watchmen and Batman may indicate various personality disorders and traits, notes from the World Health Organization indicate that even amongst Men and Women there are unique predispositions:

Some of the findings are intuitively easy to accept, such as alcoholism in men:

The lifetime prevalence rate for alcohol dependence, another common disorder, is more than twice as high in men than women. In developed countries, approximately 1 in 5 men and 1 in 12 women develop alcohol dependence during their lives.

And post-traumatic stress from sexual violence in women:

The high prevalence of sexual violence to which women are exposed and the correspondingly high rate of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) following such violence, renders women the largest single group of people affected by this disorder.

Why would this be the case? (more…)

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