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Posts Tagged ‘deception’

A Zeitgeist quote is a good lead in:

They must find it difficult, those who have taken authority as truth, rather than truth as authority.

– Gerald Massey

Here’s from Jason Cooper’s new post today:

What is the truth?

Who can we really trust in this apparent world (The Matrix) of deception?

Should we trust:

• The Educational System?
• The Religious Leaders?
• The Media?
• The Law?
• The Government?
• The Conspiracy Theorists?
• Or in fact, any sort of so-called authority of information and knowledge, such as the ones mentioned above, who are suppose to be the benevolent and wise leaders of truth, integrity and justice?

The next thing I’m about to say may contain more than an air of cynicism and conspiracy, but if we are to be honest with ourselves, frankly, we have been led down the garden path for most of our lives.

Unfortunately, there are powerful people out there who choose to monopolise the dissemination of knowledge and information to the masses, and who wish nothing more than to seduce our minds to the point of slumber whilst manipulating us towards submitting our will, freedom and very lives for them to do what they wish – no matter how pernicious.

In other words, through our own ignorance (which is mostly conditioned into us from childhood) we are unbeknowingly empowering them to enslave us psychologically.

Now is the time to take back this power and learn to empower ourselves with the knowledge and wisdom that can eliminate these masters of deception (aka disinformation agents), so that we can then emancipate our minds towards a joyful existence filled with integrity, truth and meaning.

Read the rest here.

Mandatory reading for aspiring critical thinkers.

“Sent from my BlackBerry® wireless handheld”

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I found a perfect encore to my recent reference to the scandalous ponzi scam of Bernard Madoff: Natalie Angier of the New York Times recently described evidence that deceitful behaviour is a product of evolution:

Deceitful behavior has a long and storied history in the evolution of social life, and the more sophisticated the animal, it seems, the more commonplace the con games, the more cunning their contours.

In a comparative survey of primate behavior, Richard Byrne and Nadia Corp of the University of St. Andrews in Scotland found a direct relationship between sneakiness and brain size. The larger the average volume of a primate species’ neocortex — the newest, “highest” region of the brain — the greater the chance that the monkey or ape would pull a stunt like this one described in The New Scientist: a young baboon being chased by an enraged mother intent on punishment suddenly stopped in midpursuit, stood up and began scanning the horizon intently, an act that conveniently distracted the entire baboon troop into preparing for nonexistent intruders.

Biologists distinguish between such cases of innate or automatic deception, however, and so-called tactical deception, the use of a normal behavior in a novel situation, with the express purpose of misleading an observer. Tactical deception requires considerable behavioral suppleness, which is why it’s most often observed in the brainiest animals.

See more of this fascinating take here.

So lying Madoff was no low-life scum–he was the worst and best example of human development.

For me this begs the larger question: if deceit is an ability gained through evolution, then honesty is a primitive attribute? If so does this place evolution on a moral compass? We are evolving to a propensity for less ethical or immoral behaviour?

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In just a week, Bernard Madoff has reinserted the term ponzi scheme back in the public vocabulary. As we discussed earlier, these schemes are a lopsided business model and have been victimizing investors and the public for decades. Various financial commentators such as Peter Schiff and Max Keiser are beginning to echo sentiments that the U.S. economy is, in hindsight, resembling a larger scale ponzi scheme itself.

Shifting our focus back on the man who brought back our attention to this economic phenomenon, one has to wonder at the motivations and circumstances that created the Madoff scandal. Ponzi schemes are nothing new but every new incarnation doesn’t cease to disturb me. This Madoff caper in particular has three things I find bothering.

The first thing that disturbed me about the Madoff case is the high-profile nature of the parties that were affected by it. Madoff’s client list reads like a who’s-who-of-the-elite in the U.S.

Fox News reported that wealthy socialites comprised Madoff’s list of ruined clients:

Many of his investors came from the enormously wealthy enclaves of Palm Beach, Florida and Long Island, New York, where people had invested billions in Madoff’s firm for decades. He was a fixture on the Palm Beach social scene, and was a member of some of its most exclusive clubs, including the Palm Beach Country Club and Boca Rio Golf Club, where he drummed up much of his business.

The Wall Street Journal describes Madoff as a household name among elite circles:

During golf-course and cocktail-party banter, Mr. Madoff’s name frequently surfaced as a money manager who could consistently deliver high returns. Older, Jewish investors called Mr. Madoff ” ‘the Jewish bond,’ ” says Ken Phillips, head of a Boulder, Colo., investment firm. “It paid 8% to 12%, every year, no matter what.”

Evidently, the ability to make money grow consistently is a somewhat of a nectar to the rich folk, and arguably was the key in creating the brownie points for Madoff’s pedigreed credibility. In an analysis that Andy Kessler of Forbes on the Madoff tale, he drew some similar points in qualifying Madoff’s motivations in this context: (more…)

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Here is “The Great Global Warming Swindle” which criticizes the prevailing notion of climate change and the potential deceptions being perpetrated on a global scale:

Presently people award climate change and global warming with a similar reverence to established religions. No one dares challenge the idea, because it is assumed to be true, and to challenge it is considered irresponsible and immoral.

But scientific and critical scrutiny may reveal otherwise.

More here.

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In the same vein as Zeitgeist, this documentary takes a look at the sordid history of the modern financial system, from the conspiracy point of view. An excerpt from the video:

“The problem is since 1864 we’ve had a debt based banking system. All our money is based on government debt. We cannot extinguish government debt without extinguishing our money supply. That’s why talk of paying off the national debt without reforming our banking system is an impossibility. That’s why the solution does not lie in discussing the size of the national debt rather it lies in reforming our banking system.”

well what we’re about to show you is that there’s nothing federal about the Federal Reserve and there are no reserves. The name is a deception created back before the Federal Reserve Act was passed, in 1913, to make Americans think that America’s central bank operates in the publics interest. The truth is that the Federal Reserve is a private bank owned by private stockholders and run purely for their private profit.”

Like all economic theories, these are noteworthy to examine especially during market crises. Check out the video here.

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