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Posts Tagged ‘wonder’

Controversial philosopher and lover of life, Rajneesh Chandra Mohan Jain, also known as Osho and his thoughts:

On Truth:

If you wish to see the truth, then hold no opinion for or against.

Let this truth go as deep in you as possible: that life is already here, arrived. You are standing on the goal. Don’t ask about the path.

The ‘truth’ is only a way of speaking; there is not something labeled ‘Truth,’ that one day you will find and open the box and see the contents and say, ‘Great! I have found the truth.’ There is no such box. Your existence is the truth, and when you are silent you are in truth. And if the silence is absolute then you are the ultimate truth. But don’t think of the truth as an object -it is not an object. It is not there, it is here.

On Courage:

You cannot be truthful if you are not courageous. You cannot be loving if you are not courageous. You cannot be trusting if you are not courageous. You cannot enter into reality if you are not courageous. Hence courage comes first… and everything else follows.

On Dreams:

Nobody is here to fulfill your dream. Everybody is here to fulfill his own destiny, his own reality.

On Ecstasy:

Ecstasy is our very nature; not to be ecstatic is simply unnecessary. To be ecstatic is natural, spontaneous. It needs no effort to be ecstatic, it needs great effort to be miserable. That’s why you look to tired, because misery is really hard work; to maintain it is really difficult, because you are doing something against nature.

On Love:

Only those who are ready to become nobodies are able to love.

When love and hate are both absent everything becomes clear and undisguised.

Falling in love you remain a child; rising in love you mature. By and by love becomes not a relationship, it becomes a state of your being. Not that you are in love – now you are love.

You can love as many people as you want – that does not mean one day you will go bankrupt, and you will have to declare, ‘Now I have no love.’ You cannot go bankrupt as far as love is concerned.

Millions of people are suffering: they want to be loved but they don’t know how to love. And love cannot exist as a monologue; it is a dialogue, a very harmonious dialogue.

On Fun, Joy, and Laughs:

Become more and more innocent, less knowledgeable and more childlike. Take life as fun – because that’s precisely what it is!

Fools laugh at others. Wisdom laughs at itself.

Take hold of your own life. See that the whole existence is celebrating. These trees are not serious, these birds are not serious. The rivers and the oceans are wild, and everywhere there is fun, everywhere there is joy and delight. Watch existence, listen to the existence and become part of it.

Seriousness is a sickness; your sense of humor makes you more human, more humble. The sense of humor — according to me — is one of the most essential parts of religiousness.

A little foolishness, enough to enjoy life, and a little wisdom to avoid the errors, that will do.

On Variety:

Life is a balance between rest and movement.

Experience life in all possible ways — good-bad, bitter-sweet, dark-light, summer-winter. Experience all the dualities. Don’t be afraid of experience, because the more experience you have, the more mature you become.

On Independent Thought:

To be alone in the only real revolution. To accept that you are alone is the greatest transformation that can happen to you.

Only people who carry the opinions of others need the support of others.

On Wonder:

Remain in wonder if you want the mysteries to open up for you. Mysteries never open up for those who go on questioning. Questioners sooner or later end up in a library. Questioners sooner or later end up with scriptures, because scriptures are full of answers. And answers are dangerous, they kill your wonder.

On Risk:

Do you think the people who were trying to reach to the Everest were not full of doubts? For a hundred years, how many people tried and how many people lost their lives? Do you know how many people never came back? But, still, people come from all over the world, risking, knowing they may never return. For them it is worth it – because in the very risk something is born inside of them: the center. It is born only in the risk. That’s the beauty of risk, the gift of risk.

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Pre-eminent Catholic priest, scholar, and theologian, Thomas Aquinas and his thoughts on religion, morality, and the human mind:

Free will:

A man has free choice to the extent that he is rational.

Diversity:

Because of the diverse conditions of humans, it happens that some acts are virtuous to some people, as appropriate and suitable to them, while the same acts are immoral for others, as inappropriate to them.

On wonder:

Wonder is the desire for knowledge.

Because philosophy arises from awe, a philosopher is bound in his way to be a lover of myths and poetic fables. Poets and philosophers are alike in being big with wonder.

Proactivity:

Better to illuminate than merely to shine, to deliver to others contemplated truths than merely to contemplate.

Narrow-mindedness:

Beware of the person of one book.

Equality:

By nature all men are equal in liberty, but not in other endowments.

Blind faith:

Clearly the person who accepts the Church as an infallible guide will believe whatever the Church teaches.

Good and evil:

Good can exist without evil, whereas evil cannot exist without good.

Risk:

If the highest aim of a captain were to preserve his ship, he would keep it in port forever.

Independent thought:

The highest manifestation of life consists in this: that a being governs its own actions. A thing which is always subject to the direction of another is somewhat of a dead thing.

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In one of his last public addresses, astronomer Carl Sagan discusses how his wonder about the universe was awakened by the stars and the sun. He continues on issues regarding Science, superstition, religion, faith, education, skepticism, and Humanism.

Sagan describes how science rewards those who disprove ideas, which is the ideological opposite in politics, religion and other social constructs: which reward those who reassure or reinforce existing ideas–which is the fundamental reason why science has progressed so much, while other social constructs have stagnated.

He speaks of the internal corrective mechanism in science: that all scientists acknowledge fallibility of ideas. He says: “be willing to surrender your ideas” meaning criticism and critical thinking is at the core of science.

He also talks about the dangers of pseudo-science, which has a tendency to crowd out genuine science in the popular imagination.

Further parts follow: (more…)

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